Tag Archives: zucchini squash

Easy Delicious Pot of Soup

Get Started On GAPS With This Easy Pot of Soup

Easy Delicious Pot of Soup

Easy Pot of Soup or Homemade Soup Using Your Homemade Stock

  • 8 cups homemade stock (see recipes and more instructions below)
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 2 cups cauliflower broken into small pieces
  • 2 zucchini squash, peeled and seeds removed (if any viable ones are present) and diced

Bring stock to a boil and add vegetables. Once again bring to a boil, and then lower heat until the soup is on a simmer. Cook for twenty to thirty minutes, testing the vegetables to make sure they are very soft, this makes them easier to digest. Add in the meats and other soft tissues (you may wish to blend the soft tissues first so as to make the soup more palatable). An easy way to make a nice creamy soup is to blend the vegetables and stock, and “soft bits” and then add in pieces of meat to the creamed soup.

More Information on Stock while on GAPS

Dr. Natasha outlines the GAPS nutritional protocol on her website and gives a recipe for Introduction Soup, I'm going to convert that recipe into standard recipe format to make it easier to get started.

Please note there is a difference between meat stock and bone broth. Many people coming to GAPS assume they are making bone broth, but the process which Dr. Natasha describes on her site for making Introduction Soup is meat stock. She has also answered a question regarding meat stock and bone broth in her Frequently Asked Questions page:

When making broth, is there any nutritional difference between shorter cooking times as described in the GAPS book and extended cooking times as recommended by WAPF? What about adding vinegar while cooking?

In the GAPS book I have described how to make meat stock. There is a difference between meat stock and bone broth. Meat stock is made with raw meat on a bone and it needs to be cooked just long enough to cook the meat thoroughly (2-3 hours), so it can be eaten, and so the bone marrow can be taken out of the bone and consumed. The meat stock made this way is usually clear and delicious, with an excellent nutritional value: it is particularly rich in amino acids. Bone broth is made out of bones which can be raw or cooked or a mixture (many people collect cooked bones from their meals, keep them in the freezer and use them for making the broth). In order to leach minerals out of the bones we add vinegar to the water. It is not necessary to add vinegar to the meat stock unless you need it for a particular taste. Bone broth may have quite a different nutritional composition from the meat stock and a different taste. Both are beneficial and should be used in GAPS diet.

 

Dr. Natasha says:

Add some probiotic food into every bowl of soup (the detail about introducing probiotic foods follow). Your patient should eat these soups with boiled meat and other soft tissues off the bones as often as he/she wants to all day.

Meat Stock

  • joints, bones, a piece of meat on the bone, a whole chicken, giblets from chicken, goose or duck, whole pigeons, pheasants or other inexpensive meats. (“It is essential to use bones and joints, as they provide the healing substances, not so much the muscle meats. Ask the butcher to cut in half the large tubular bones, so you can get the bone marrow out of them after cooking.“)
  • water to cover
  • unprocessed salt to your taste
  • about 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns, roughly crushed

Fish Stock

  • whole fish or fish fins, bones and heads
  • water to cover
  • unprocessed salt to your taste
  • about 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns, roughly crushed

Basic Chicken Stock Simplified (here I will give you an actual recipe that I use based on Dr. Natasha's instructions)

  • 1 whole chicken
  • 12 cups water
  • Unprocessed salt to your taste
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns, roughly crushed

Bring to a boil. After one-half hour, remove the scum that risen to the top.

Continue to simmer for 2 to 2.5 hours. Remove the bones and meat to separate bowl, and strain the stock to remove small bones and peppercorns. Separate the meat from the bones and other pieces. Your strained chicken stock can be served to your patient, or you can make your first pot of homemade soup.

Basic Chicken Stock Intermediate (although Dr. Natasha says to start this from the get-go I found it hard to incorporate the “soft bits”, marrow, etc. immediately so I have separated the two basic chicken stocks)

  • 1 whole chicken
  • 12 cups water
  • Unprocessed salt to your taste
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns, roughly crushed

Bring to a boil. After one-half hour, remove the scum that risen to the top.

Continue to simmer for 2 to 2.5 hours. Remove the bones and meat to separate bowl, and strain the stock to remove small bones and peppercorns. Separate the meat from the bones and other pieces. Your strained chicken stock can be served to your patient, or you can make your first pot of homemade soup.

Here's the intermediate part. Remove all the soft tissues from the bones as best as you can to add to soups. Soft tissues as I understand it are basically anything “soft” that could be blended. Also, cooking the gelatinous soft pieces for a longer cooking period will cause them to completely melt. Take care that you do not include any pieces of bone or hard pieces as you will cause the texture to become grainy which can be unpalatable. Remove bone marrow from bones while they are warm, for chicken bones this would be accomplished by cracking open the chicken leg bones and thigh bones. If they are cooked long enough, they will simply crumble.

Dr. Natasha says about these stocks:

The gelatinous soft tissues around the bones and the bone marrow provide some of the best healing remedies for the gut lining and the immune system; your patient needs to consume them with every meal. Keep giving your patient warm meat stock as a drink all day with his meals and between meals. Do not use microwaves for warming up the stock, use conventional stove (microwaves destroy food). It is very important for your patient to consume all the fat in the stock and off the bones as these fats are essential for the healing process. Add some probiotic food into every cup of stock (the details about introducing probiotic foods follow).

Okay, now it's time for homemade soup using your homemade stock. Dr. Natasha mentions these vegetables specifically:

Recommended Vegetables for Intro Soups

“You can choose any combination of available vegetables avoiding very fibrous ones, such as all varieties of cabbage and celery. All particularly fibrous parts of vegetables need to be removed, such as skin and seeds on pumpkins, marrows and squashes, stock of broccoli and cauliflower and any other parts that look too fibrous. Cook the vegetables well, so they are really soft.”

  • Onions [affiliate link]
  • Carrots (remove skin)
  • Broccoli (remove fibrous parts)
  • Leeks
  • Cauliflower (remove fibrous parts)
  • Courgettes
  • Marrow
  • Squash (remove seeds and in winter squash, the skin)
  • Pumpkin [affiliate link] (remove seeds and skin)

Vegetables to Avoid for Intro Soups

  • Celery
  • Cabbage

It's so easy to make a pot of soup and get started on GAPS. The healing properties of broth are enormous and if you are interested in learning more please go here to read a white paper which will tell you all you ever wanted to know about broth: Traditional Bone Broth in Modern Health and Disease by Allison Siebecker. She defines what broth is, explains the basic method for making it, describes the nutritional content from the connective tissue, bones, bone marrow, cartilage, collagen, gelatin [affiliate link], and then explains the amino acid profile of broth, and she discusses the minerals and macrominerals in broth. She also gives an extensive list of conditions which can benefit from adding broth into the diet. Quite a complex and informative read about broth which I highly recommend.

If you love recipes like this, I have two cookbooks you really need to check out ASAP! Beyond Grain and Dairy for gluten-free recipes and Winter Soups.

GAPS DIET JOURNEY is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to AMAZON.COM. GAPS DIET JOURNEY is an affiliate for several companies and may be compensated through advertising and marketing channels. Therefore, this post may contain affiliate links.

Red Pepper and Cabbage Ground Beef Stroganoff (No Noodles!)

Red Bell Pepper and Cabbage StroganoffI just love the colorful presentation of vegetables in this dish, I've made it twice so far. I would say this amount would serve four light eaters, but if you are hefty eaters, maybe only two.

I loved this dish with cayenne, I put in 1/4 teaspoon. If you don't like “hot” don't use the cayenne, and please test with a light sprinkle first if you do want to try it.

I thought this dish was similar to noodle casserole dishes I've made in years past. The wide cut cabbage reminded me of egg noodles. I know cabbage isn't noodles, but I sometimes miss having the mouth feel of wide egg noodles, so this was a nice substitute.

It is quite delicious and I believe you'll agree.

Red Pepper and Cabbage Stroganoff

1 pound of zucchini squash
2 T. butter, ghee or coconut oil [affiliate link]
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 large red bell pepper, chopped into 1/2″ to 3/4″ pieces
1 pound of hamburger
4 cloves [affiliate link] of garlic, chopped or minced
1 pound of cabbage sliced into 1″ thick wedges
1/4 teaspoon cayenne, optional

Quarter the zucchini squash length-wise, then slice about 1/4″ thick. Place a steamer into a pan large enough to hold the squash. Put water in the bottom and put the zucchini into the steamer. Allow to steam until fork tender (mine took 20 minutes).

Melt the butter, ghee or coconut oil in a pan. Add the chopped onion and red bell pepper. Saute until onion begins to turn transparent, about five minutes. Add the hamburger and cook until it is no longer pink. Add the garlic, and the pound of cabbage. Pour in 1/2 cup of water, cover and cook for twenty minutes.

When the vegetables are all transparent or fork tender, mix together in a bowl.

Recipe: Red Pepper and Cabbage Stroganoff
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Dish
Cuisine: American Vegetable Stroganoff
Serves: 4
 
I thought this dish was similar to noodle casserole dishes I've made in the past since the widely sliced cabbage was similar to wide egg noodles.
Ingredients
  • 1 pound of zucchini squash
  • 2 T. butter, ghee or coconut oil
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • 1 large red bell pepper, chopped into ½" to ¾" pieces
  • 1 pound of hamburger
  • 4 cloves of garlic, chopped or minced
  • 1 pound of cabbage sliced into 1" thick wedges
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne, optional
Instructions
  1. Quarter the zucchini squash length-wise, then slice about ¼" thick. Place a steamer into a pan large enough to hold the squash. Put water in the bottom and put the zucchini into the steamer. Allow to steam until fork tender (about 20 minutes).
  2. Melt the butter, ghee or coconut oil in a pan. Add the chopped onion and red bell pepper. Saute until onion begins to turn transparent, about five minutes. Add the hamburger and cook until it is no longer pink. Add the garlic and cabbage. Pour in ½ cup of water, cover and cook for 20 minutes.
  3. When the vegetables are all transparent or fork tender, mix together in a bowl.
Notes
I would say this amount would serve four light eaters, but if you are hefty eaters, maybe only two people.

I loved this dish with cayenne, I put in ¼ teaspoon, but I think my cayenne is a little old because it doesn't taste very hot lately. If you don't like "hot" don't use the cayenne, and please test with a light sprinkle first if you do want to try it.

 

Let me know if you try this dish!

If you love recipes like this, I have two cookbooks you really need to check out ASAP! Beyond Grain and Dairy for gluten-free recipes and Winter Soups.

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GAPS DIET JOURNEY is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to AMAZON.COM. GAPS DIET JOURNEY is an affiliate for several companies and may be compensated through advertising and marketing channels. Therefore, this post may contain affiliate links.

Chicken Soup My Dear Husband’s GAPS Legal Version

Dh's Chicken Soup

My hubby makes some killer chicken stock. He makes some great soups, too. Here is one recipe of his:

  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 half previously cooked chicken breast, diced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 1/2 cup celery
  • 1/2 cup onion
  • 1/2 chopped zucchini squash (optional)
  • 1 cup chopped cabbage
  • 3 cloves [affiliate link] garlic, diced
  • 2 Tablespoons chicken grease, or butter

Optional ingredients which may not be GAPS friendly: 2-3 drops Worcestershire sauce, 1/8 teaspooon herbs (marjoram, thyme, basil, parsley [affiliate link]).

Melt the chicken grease or butter into a pot, add garlic, onions [affiliate link] and celery. Saute until onion turns translucent. Add broth, add all other ingredients. Add herbs at the very end. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

 

Recipe: Chicken Soup Dh's Version
Author: 
Recipe type: Soup
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
My hubby makes some killer chicken stock. He makes some great soups, too. Here is one recipe of his
Ingredients
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 half previously cooked chicken breast, diced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • ½ cup celery
  • ½ cup onion
  • ½ chopped zucchini squash (optional)
  • 1 cup chopped cabbage
  • 3 cloves garlic, diced
  • 2 Tablespoons chicken grease, or butter
Instructions
  1. Melt the chicken grease or butter into a pot, add garlic, onions and celery.
  2. Saute until onion turns translucent.
  3. Add broth, add all other ingredients.
  4. Add herbs at the very end.
  5. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

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Looking for more soup recipes? Winter Soups is A Best of Community Cookbook which contains 52 soup recipes, one for each week of the year! Click here to get yours!

Winter Soups Community Cookbook

GAPS DIET JOURNEY is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to AMAZON.COM. GAPS DIET JOURNEY is an affiliate for several companies and may be compensated through advertising and marketing channels. Therefore, this post may contain affiliate links.