Best Supplements for a GAPS Diet

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Going on any specific diet means dealing with a few restrictions, especially if you want to get fitter faster. Because the Standard American Diet is so filled with carbs, fats, and sugars, starting on the road to fitness requires some level of effort.

The GAPS Diet can be a challenge in a different way; however, the benefits will often be worth the effort.

In my article ‘Which Should I Do First? Introduction or Full GAPS', I talk about the transition process to follow the GAPS diet. Every GAPS journey is different, but once you've settled into your routine more options open up for nutrition. Whole food is always the main focus of GAPS, and after you've gone through Introduction you can start to add a few supplements.

Fish and cod liver oil

Fatty acids like omega-3 play a large role in the GAPS diet, so it's important that you get the proper amount. Many GAPS experts recommend daily supplementation of fish oil or cod liver oil capsules, which are rich in omega-3, as well as vitamins A and D. The best fish oil supplements should come in dark-colored glass containers, and should be properly refrigerated and kept to avoid rancidity. One of the best cod liver oils can be sourced from Nordic Naturals, which is sourced from Arctic cod, and contains zero additives.

Probiotics

The gut is obviously the center of the GAPS diet, so we should be doing our best to ensure that it's operating at maximum efficiency. One of the best ways to help your gut is through taking healthy bacteria like probiotics. Probiotics help keep the balance of healthy bacteria in your gut, easing digestion and reducing bloating, gas, and other gut problems. Experts recommend that there should be at least 8 billion bacterial cells per gram. The superfood and probiotic blend by Brightcore is a great option for this, as it contains 10 billion live probiotics, as well as fiber and omegas. It's certified organic, GMO-free, and dairy-free as well, making it a perfect complement to the GAPS diet.

Betaine HCl

People on the GAPS diet tend to have lower stomach acid production. Remedying this involves taking a betaine HCl supplement with added pepsin. Betaine HCl is a manufactured form of hydrochloric acid, which is one of the main stomach acids found in the human body. Pepsin, meanwhile, is an enzyme also produced in the stomach which allows the body to break down and absorb protein. Solaray's HCl with Pepsin dietary supplement is a straightforward, simple formulation that's highly effective. It delivers 650 mg of betaine HCl and 162 mg of pepsin per serving, making it a popular and efficient choice.

Healthy oils

If you're on the GAPS diet, you probably know that you're advised to have a 2:1 ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3s are commonly found in fatty fish, while omega-6 fatty acids can be sourced from seed or nut oil. According to RxList, omega-6 fatty acids can reduce your risk for heart disease and lower bad cholesterol levels, and could minimize your risk for cancer.

Always remember to add supplements one at a time to make sure they agree with you. There is nothing worse than adding several new foods or supplements only to find you have to remove everything and start all over because you had a reaction and aren't sure what affected you.

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3 Easy Ways to Rescue Those Poor Leftover Vegetables

Green cabbageMost people don't like to waste food. Especially if you have ever been through a time in your life when you didn't have enough food, it can really make you think twice. Did it ever occur to you that you're literally throwing money in the garbage when you let food go bad?

Or maybe it's not that you're letting your vegetables go bad, maybe you don't have enough to go around. Here are a few ways to use vegetables to make sure you don't waste food or money!

Here are the three ways I use vegetables to keep them from going to waste.

Stir Fry

Stir fry can be complicated or simple, but let's go for simple and use those leftover vegetables. You can use a wok if you have one, but a cast iron or stainless steel skillet will work great as well.

Hopefully you aren't using non-stick pans but if you do, please avoid them for stir fry because you'll be cooking at high temperatures.

Heat your skillet on medium-high and plunk a tablespoon or so of your favorite fat (I really like using coconut oil [affiliate link] with stir fry) into the skillet and start with one or two cups of vegetables. You'll want to stir every few seconds so they can cook but not scorch or burn. Cook in batches of one to two cups at a time, and as each batch is done, move the vegetables to a large bowl, replenish the oil and do the next batch.

Here are some good combinations, but as I said before, use what you have on hand!

  • Cabbage, carrots, peas, green beans, onions [affiliate link], garlic, yellow crookneck squash
  • Celery, onions, carrots, asparagus, spinach, mushrooms
  • Onions, garlic, red and green bell peppers, ginger [affiliate link], green beans, cabbage
  • Broccoli, mushrooms, onions, carrots, peas

Don't forget to use leftover meat in stir fry.

And one more thing… consider the way you prepare the vegetables. You can use a potato peeler to peel long strips of carrots for carrot noodles, a julienne slicer for matchstick sized pieces of zucchini. You would be surprised at how different and pretty your food can be when you mix it up a little when you're cutting it up.

Soup

My mom did this when I was growing up, and I started doing it when I moved out on my own. It's so simple. Just keep a dedicated freezer safe container in the same place in your freezer (a gallon Ziploc freezer bag works great if you're short on space) and every time you have any leftover vegetables instead of tossing them, put them into the container.

Before too long you'll have enough to make a great pot of soup. My favorite method is make chicken stock, then strain out the bones. Add your container of vegetables. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 15-20 minutes or until the vegetables are fork tender. Add salt and pepper to taste and dinner is ready!

Quiche

Another favorite way to use leftover vegetables is to make quiche.

And you don't really need a crust, although you could make one from coconut flour.

You’ll need around two cups of steamed or sautéed vegetables for a 9-1/2″ pie pan. Season the vegetables by adding salt and pepper, onion powder and garlic powder [affiliate link]. Season them to taste, and if you're using a pie crust, prebake it first.

Spoon the vegetables into the pie crust or even an empty pie tin when they are fork tender. If you can eat dairy products, grate in some cheddar cheese. Then scramble 3 or 4 eggs [affiliate link] and pour in on top of the vegetables.

Bake at 350°F until the top is lightly browned and firm, about twenty minutes. Cool for 20 minutes and serve. Quiche is also delicious cold, super quick for breakfast on the go, a great finger food if you need something easy for lunch at work and don’t have the time or means to heat it.

Let me know in the comments if you have used any of these ways to utilize leftover vegetables! 

GAPS DIET JOURNEY is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to AMAZON.COM. GAPS DIET JOURNEY is an affiliate for several companies and may be compensated through advertising and marketing channels. Therefore, this post may contain affiliate links.